Arte1misia: proviamolo! Let me try it!

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So what do I do here? I Re/blogging my favorite photos, sharing stuff with followers, tagging, and more of those in that way I take a break :-)

I am enjoying myself, having a good time on tumblr because you don't die to know if someone is reading me. It's interactive but not all that much. Fair enought. I'm a bit asocial too!



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ovvero che faccio qui? Beh, salvo e ribloggo le mie foto preferite, le condivido con chi mi segue, aggiungo la tag e mi rilasso
:P
Nell'attesa su tumblr mi diverto forse perchè non è un blog in cui senti il muschio crescere prima di sapere che c'è qualcuno che ti legge! E' interattivo MA non troppo. Il giusto! Perchè un minimo asociale lo sono!
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Posts tagged "installation"

hydeordie:

Time lapse of a Cy Twombly installation at the Menil Collection in Houston.

Give it a second, it takes a minute to get started, because it’s worth it.

Si beh il coso sul muro non mi dice un gran chè…che spettacolo gli operai (e credo sia questo il tema) XD

Installation apothecary’s shop

Installazione: la bottega dello speziale

julienfoulatier:

Installation/Photography by JR.

Tke a look on the JR site it’s surprising

condenasttraveler:

Today I took off all my clothes and entered Giant Psycho Tank—a large, faintly lit, polypropylene tank filled with about a foot of supersaline water. Why did I do this you ask? For the art of the experience, of course. Welcome to the New Museum’s terrifically fun, thrilling and sometimes downright disorienting exhibition Carsten Höller: Experience, on view now through January 15 in NYC. Höller is probably best known for his long, elegant, tubular slides. At this exhibit, visitors can scoot themselves into a 40-feet high, 102-feet long, steel and glass tube on the fourth floor and zoom down to the second floor—screaming all the way. Happily, the nude averse can do this fully clothed.

—Keith Mulvihill

Check out video of the giant slide here.

theydesign:

‘On the Shelf’ (1970) by Michael Craig-Martin

yep!

Pipilotti Rist Sip My Ocean
Audio-video installation

A “little” tribute to Pipilotti Rist. “Sip my Ocean”, 1996, is a video installation with scenes projected in duplicate as mirrored reflections on two adjoining walls, with the corner between them an immobile seam around which psychedelic configurations radiate and swirl. Choreographed to a sound track of the artist alternatively crooning and hysterically shrieking Chris Isaak’s song “Wicked Game”. I saw that, for the first time, in the Guggenheim Museum of Bilbao. Still now it’s impossible to find the complete version on the web.

Pipilotti Rist Sip My Ocean 1996
Audio-video installation

A translucent medium like the ocean is ambiguously distance, a glass, and reflective as a looking glass. Does it bring one closer, bar one forever, or fixate a woman on her own image? Swimming orients Rist horizontally, of course, but just try to guess whether she is pleading for sex.

Sip the Ocean spans two walls, in mirror reflection.  Rist defines herself by her appearance in a mirror.

I see it in CPH in 2006 ^ ^

very suggestive!


Pipilotti Rist

Sip My Ocean
Audio-video installation
Installation view, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, 2000

© Pipilotti Rist / Photo: B. Merrett

(via thingssheloves)

foto 

Scattered Crowd

An installation by choreographer William Forsythe in the main hall of Austria’s parliament for the ImPulsTanz festival 2008.

Scattered Crowd is an installation of balloons by choreographer William Forsythe, which could be seen in the main hall of Austria’s parliament during the ImPulsTanz festival 2008.

According to The Forsythe Company’s website, ‘Four thousand white balloons, suspended in a billowing wash of sound; an air-borne landscape of relationship, of distance, of humans and emptiness, of coalescence and decision. In the gorgeous, breathless space that is choreographer William Forsythe’s “Scattered Crowd”, the viewer inhabits and alters, through their stillness or speed, their sense of proportion and time, the configurations that make up this constantly shifting, ecstatic world.’